Sacrifice

Unseen

A few days ago I blogged about the role of faith in an epic high fantasy story.  Now, if I mentioned faith and sacrifice in the same sentence would you automatically think, “Oh no, here comes a Jesus Christ reference!”

Think for a moment of a soldier.  A soldier is one who goes to battle to protect those he loves from what appears to be of evil intent.  He has faith in his commanders judgment and is willing to lay down his life for what he believes is the highest of chivalric and noble character – to give one’s life for something greater than himself.  Now, this certainly is no reference to Jesus Christ, who died to save mankind of its sins.

Now go one step further.  If a person received a command by the highest authority, his creator, and was supplied with gifts to set off on a journey to free seven enslaved races, knowing full well there will be tests and possible sacrifice, would you still insist the story was about Jesus Christ?

Here’s the setup.  The Unseen, the mythical creator of my universe, pondered the creation of life, both immortal and mortal.  What would happen and which would be more noble?  His first thought is that the immortals would be, so he creates ten to steward over ten heavenly worlds, until he sees very quickly that from free will there are those that will not submit to his authority.  He then creates mortal beings and for the immortals to be their stewards.  He then proclaims that one day from the line of the first prophet, in the seventh line, a seventh son, Arimar, the messenger, will be born and that all evil will attempt to destroy him and his followers.  The rebellious steward, Haggarfuse, unwilling to submit, designs to destroy everything and one-by-one nine worlds fall to complete death and darkness.  It is on the final world, Allivar, which means The One Family, converges with their created beasts and demons.  Arimar at birth is rushed and veiled until he reaches the age of wisdom and is then called to set off on his task.  Having free will he almost commits suicide for the stress is too high with the expectations placed on him from prophecy, which is no more than a test.

Now that you have an idea of the brief history, Arimar sets off on his journey, which is just as perilous as any you have ever read.  There is a journey to the north to confront a possessed king and then there is a journey home through a land where evil’s creations are Bound to Forbidden Lands, with every step being a test of faith.

Then the final battle of good and evil arrives in Last Stand of the Living.  Here all the captains, the seventh son of he seventh generation of each race, rises from the fallen ages, to stand united. There in the battle, that is being lost, Arimar sees all that he loves: his captains and Elissia, whom he hopes to marry one day, sacrifice all they are, but appear to die to in a vain attempt.  When he could easily lose his faith, Arimar is given a choice, to leave with the Unseen and not experience death, or to stay and die with all that remains of his mortal family.  He then bargains with the Unseen that if he gives his own life, would the remaining peoples of the races be saved.  The Unseen asks if he would truly do such a thing.  Arimar offers it freely.

This is where I will tell you no more, because the battle takes a turn you will not see coming, yet was hinted over and over again in the first nine chapters of Rise of the Fallen. All I can say here, is that the battle is the largest I have ever read, which includes those found in the Lord of the Rings.  How is that for a teaser?

The moral is simple, are we the living more worthy of stewardship than the immortals?  Will the pain of loss and death teach us more of racial harmony and the stewardship of worlds?  Are we able to withstand every test and stand for our faith?  Will we, the living, stand against evil in all its forms and do what is right?  Are we worthy enough? We will not see the fleeting nature of life, and the futility of war and hatred?  We will understand the gift of life with all its pains?

This is the gist of the trilogy, then there are the upcoming Chronicles of Allivar, which is a parallel journey of history and events of the nine fallen worlds, the first six ages of Allivar and the final story in the seventh age – the age of light.  When you complete the trilogy you will understand the nature and path of the chronicles.  The first in this series is titled – The Fall of Helloria.

Seven is a significant number for it represents perfect completion.  This is a hint for you as a reader.  All you need to do is take a leap of faith and enter my world of Allivar.  You will think, you will cry, but I promise you this too… you will cheer.

This is a mythology covering creation, life and the end of the ages.  Those who love The Silmarillion, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings should easily understand the context and construct of my stories.

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Sketching Your Demon

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Haggarfuse – A Charamorg

As an author and self-publisher, I do it all, including all technology duties.  Recently, one of my reader’s suggested I provide images of my creations.  This would help them visualize the characters and demons.  I truly love to leave such issues to the imagination of the reader, but if a simple sketch can help excite these readers and future readers, then I will take the time.

Let me say that my day job is being an accountant.  Going back as far as I can remember, I have had an active imagination.  I am possibly ADD. Back in my youth, I’d draw monsters on paper and cut them out to play with.  We didn’t have video games – 3,000 TV channels, or other devices of modern technology we now take for granted or feel entitled to.  We read.  We went to see the movies when we could save enough money for the ticket, a soft drink, and one large salty pickle.  Our visual effects of the day now seem lame, but back then they sparked the imagination with a fury. I still vividly recall the monsters of my youth: The Creature of the Black Lagoon, Valley of the Gwangi, Godzilla, King Kong, Frankenstein, Dracula, Alien and most of all – The Exorcist. Then I’d daydream on those nights that sleep evaded me.  I created my own worlds and heroes, and the demons and monsters those heroes fought.  I never wanted to be an accountant, I actually wanted to be an architectural engineer, designing homes and structures.  I wanted to be a creator with this imagination. But with all things, reality crashes in and one must find a method of support.  Accounting has been good for me in this respect.

Above is a rough sketch of one of my creations, demented as it might be.  What you are seeing is Haggarfuse, a Charamorg, an ethereal steward of the damned.  One might consider him to be the devil, the one who rebelled against his maker, who brought havoc upon worlds, an immortal envious of the creator’s perceived preference to mortals .  Here in his damned state he is meant to be fearful so that all the living would easily recognize evil by sight.

It has been thirty years since I took sketching seriously.  This was the result of a couple of hours of effort.  Time, at the age of 54, is very precious to me.  I’ve worked more hours in the last 33 years than I can recall, too many nights and weekends lost,  devoted to complying with the laws of the land dictated by those in power.  I don’t know how many years I have left in this physical realm, but with what I have left, I want to return to that wonderment of my youth.  I want to create.  Not only a epic story of mythological proportion, but to bring the visions of my mind before those that still find wonderment in this world and beyond.

If you are like me in this regards, I invite you to join me on this journey.

“Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.”

Edgar Allan Poe

Dragons of the Marog

Ever since I was a small child I was fascinated by monsters.  Whether it was those that appeared in B-rated movies, or in novels, the battle between mortals and these monsters enthralled me.  Usually I felt it was impossible for the hero to defeat such forces, but somehow they always found the way.  In particular, dragons have always been my favorite monster.  Part dinosaur, part flame thrower.  Some are winged and terrify from the air, some earth bound, or hidden in the crevices waiting for an unsuspecting victim.

When I began developing the plot for my mythological trilogy, The Chosen One of Allivar, monsters had to be present to heighten the adventure and danger.  I began book one, Rise of the Fallen, by giving the reader hints of the history of my created worlds and the wars once held against dragons.  In one narrative, Arimar the hero as a young boy listens to his caretaker’s stories over a campfire about the dragons of the Marog (Forbidden Lands) and how they were bound to those lands in a previous age.   The hero is told to avoid the Marog at all cost.  An event in the first book leaves no option open for the reluctant hero.  For him to return home, the Marog is his only path.  This is a clue to the reader where the plot is bound to.

In book two, Bound to Forbidden Lands, I play around with two meanings of the word “bound.”  Bound to the Marog are four guardian Dragons that watch over the northern and southern entrances. In the Marog is Gold and other resources that people covet for greed and power sake.  The creator placed the watchers, the Gregoron, to watch over the gold.  Like the tale of the Nephilim the watchers kidnap and imprison mortal women, to give birth to their offspring, the Luminars and Luminags. Evil forces also experiment with creating giants, also bound to the lands. The Marog is heavily watched and guarded, none that have entered ever leave.  But Arimar has no choice, it is his only path home with five hundred thousand followers. So, his company is bound to the Marog.

I ratchet up the adventure in book two, with the battles the company engages with their enemies inside the Marog.  When the remnants of the company are almost safe they come to a dead end where the guardians converge upon them with fiery wrath.  How does it end or do they escape?  This is the hook, the catch, the cliff hanger.

In book three, Last Stand of the Living, I bring the reader into the frenzied pace of all out war.  A war which includes the unleashing of all evil forces bound to the Marog and the underworld, and yes all of the dragons.  I recall in the Simarillion, the battle of the sudden flame, where Dragons, Balrogs and Orc are unleashed upon the lands.  The imagery of that simple narrative inspired me to the unleashing of my imagination and the monsters of my mind.  If you are up to the challenge of this story, book three is intended to exhaust you emotionally.  And like the imagery witnessed in the movie version of Lord of the Rings, my narrative should capture your imagination of the greatest battle ever fought between the forces of good and evil.

In December we will all be able to see how the narrative of The Hobbit is played out on the screen, and get a glimpse of Smaug the Golden.  I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait.  In the meantime, if you are up to an epic adventure, give my trilogy a try.  Be forewarned, you must invest time in the first nine chapters, which deal with creation and history. There are many clues embedded in the narratives that will explain the following 2-1/2 stories.  You may find yourself rereading to uncover those clues.  Then, all the compressed history of those nine chapters shall be unleashed in the sixteen stories to follow, the Chronicles, with even more battles of dragons and monsters.

Are you ready for dragons?

Of Mythology

My trilogy “The Chosen One of Allivar” is difficult to describe in a 30 second elevator speech as many have suggested. So, after long and hard thought, the best way I can describe it is to use a quote from one of my research aids. “Mythology” the visual reference guide by Philip Wilkinson and Neil Philip, which is an excellent read by the way. The header on page 14 pretty much sums it up.

“Myths are sacred stories. They tell of the creation of the world; the emergence of gods and the first men and women; the adventures of heroes and the audacity of tricksters; the nature of the heavens and the Underworld; and what will happen when time comes to an end. Every human culture has its own myths that are passed on from one generation to the next.”

And there you have it. The trilogy is a mythology and nothing more. It is not a stealth Christian story, although Christians, Jews and Muslims may find many similarities to their faith. I am not espousing a new religion, just a story. I recall how JRR Tolkien had presented “The Silmarillion” to his publisher and how they rejected it. “The Silmarillion” is the creation story of Tolkien’s universe and laid the history for the complete comprehension of “The Lord of the Rings” and “The Hobbit”. In my opinion, to not read his entire works is to miss out on a great mythology. From this knowledge of Tolkien’s world, the great Greek and Roman myths, the canonized and non-canonized stories of the Bible, I began to craft my very own mythology.

The first nine chapters of book one, “Rise of the Fallen”, deals with the development of my universe and sets the stage for the 18 books to follow. The trilogy can be read alone because it has a definite beginning and ending that completes a full circle. The “chronicles” are sixteen stories that will expand upon the mythology and will lead right back into full comprehension of the mythology, but just from a different perspective. I promise those that have read the complete trilogy, they will not be disappointed.

For those who immediately drop the first book before completing the trilogy, all I can say is keep an open mind and continue to its conclusion. For those that do not believe in the Torah, Bible or Koran, read my stories simply as literature. Study them for the great stories and philosophy. I, for one, believe in free will, so exercise your free will to gain as much knowledge as possible. I can promise you this, if you make it to the final battle between good and evil in book three, “Last Stand of the Living” you will be on visual and emotional overload.

To learn more, start your journey here on my website

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AllivarTrilogy

Rise of the Fallen (Published)

Bound to Forbidden Lands (Published)

Last Stand of the Living (Published)

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The Fall of Helloria (First Edit Phase Feb 2013)

The Fall of Europia (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Jeronia (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Isoria (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Glutonia (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Floria (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Denmaria (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Clempatria (Premise Phase)

The Fall of Borealia (Premise Phase)

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The Age of the Warrior (Premise Phase)

The Age of the Barbarian (Premise Phase)

The Age of the Slayer (Premise Phase)

The Age of the Bloody (Premise Phase)

The Age of the Damned (Premise Phase)

The Age of the Conqueror (Premise Phase)

The Age of Light (Premise Phase)