Faith

Unseen

Since late 2011, I have been promoting my trilogy, The Chosen One of Allivar.  The story is a mythology which requires creation, life and end of times.  I’ve sold quite a few, but reviews and ratings have been very, very difficult to receive.  I’ve been told it is very good, but apparently posting a review is too difficult.  I have restrained myself from marketing it as a faith based story, because too many would never read it.  Chapter one in Rise of the Fallen starts out very similar to Genesis.  The tale of the fallen Charafuse (Angels) is very similar to that of the Satan story, and there are many inferences to stories in the Bible.  I did this for a marketing purpose, to bring familiarity to my story of the three Abrahamic religions of which there are more than a billion potential readers, nothing more.  What may appear as a religious story, is not. Here is a definition of religion:

Religion is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural systems, and world views that relate humanity to the supernatural, and to spirituality.

Since we live in a period of history where mythologies, even with the slightest hint of a creator, is deemed religious by the secular society, I will then market the trilogy and the upcoming 16 chronicles stories as a series of stories of faith, hope and spirituality.  In the end, the story is about mankind’s ability to be proper stewards and provides thought on immortal life.  It revolves around free will, family, spouse, children, races, and even the animals.

In the year 1999, I was challenged by a friend to write a story centered around a creator as the source of good, rather than the benign references in many stories.  Stars Wars has the “Force”, Lord of the Rings had the power of the elves given to them by Eru (The One), and Narnia has Aslan the Lion who is a representation of Jesus.  Robert Jordan, the author of The Wheel of Time has a creation story very similar to Christianity. George RR Martin refers to the old and new gods.  Gods lay down laws and the expectations of their creations.

In the end, the story is one about faith in something greater than ourselves and how one man is chosen to deliver the enslaved and a message to all of the living. The words Chosen One, do not refer to Christ.  Christ was God incarnate.  My hero is a mere mortal, asked to rise to the greatest challenge of all – to unite the seven divided races and stand against evil, before there is nothing left but death, darkness and eternal silence.

You will notice many inferences to other mythologies such as King Arthur and that created by Tolkien.  You will see the influence of Dante’s Inferno and Milton’s Paradise Lost.  In its simplest of form it is derived from this popular quote:

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

It is spiritual, highly emotional and so very human of a story.  It is allegorical, it has meaning and a moral behind it.  Will we the living finally become the stewards we were meant to be?  This is the question and should challenge all those who have faith and hope that there is greatness in and after life.

So now I submit to all those who love stories of faith, whether it be Life of Pi, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Wheel of Time, or another story I have not yet read – take a chance on a timeless story of good and evil and faith in things unseen. I am not asking you to convert to anything, follow me, or start a cult, but to enjoy a story – that’s all.  I promise you will be crying and cheering at the same time.

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The Cosmic Snowball

Comet

Look ma, it’s me!

Last night I found myself in a heated discussion with my daughter over my trilogy.  I am reformatting the stories under my publishing company control and I am going to insert a Prologue.  I truly hate prologues, but apparently we live in a period of time where readers want a snippet of the story before deciding to invest their time and a whopping $2.99.  My trilogy is a mythology, it is not espousing a religion. A mythology, to which there are numerous ones throughout all of human history, deals with the creation story by a god or gods, the interaction of mortals and immortals and the end of times.

She believes my main character is the savior figure – Christ.  First, Christ was God incarnate so that he could communicate with the living. Second, Christ died solely for the purpose of collecting sins to demonstrate God’s love for his creation.  My hero is neither of these. He is as mortal as you or I. Then she had an issue with the word “creation” and insisted her generation could not tolerate the connotation with the word.  Funny how we can watch movies about Perseus and the God Zeus and find enjoyment.  Maybe they have not yet read classical Greek and Roman mythology.

This is where I lost it, sorry, but if our youth cannot bear a story of good versus evil, where good is derived from a creators will, then please read and reread all the erotic vampire and comic book reincarnations of Spider Man to satisfy your intellectual cravings.  An author that sacrifices his story’s integrity to the political correctness of the day, is not much of an author. I was raised in a period of time where skepticism was taught, but that seeking knowledge was encouraged to understand the opposing point of view, we were much more tolerant than we are today.

If the creation aspect of my story reminds you of the bible, it was because I wanted to bring an air of familiarity to those readers of the three major religions of Abraham. This is for marketing purposes only. I have had Christians say it is not a Christian story.  You know what?  You are right – it is not, nor has ever been intended to be a Christian story.  But I think Christians might just enjoy it immensely and give cause for discussion.  We supposedly live in a period where racial tolerance is sought.  Guess what, my story deals with this.  People will line up and spend their paychecks watching Avatar over and over again, and then have to visit their shrinks because they wish we lived in a world where the environment and habitat of others is respected and protected.  Guess what, my story deals with this too. It deals with the human condition, especially family, in a mythological setting with an allegory of the troubles we find in our world today.  Will we humans do what is right and good to save this world?

Did anyone ever wonder who Gandalf  was and where he came from? Guess what, Tolkien has a creation story too, yet we love his creation and wish for more.

“There was Eru, The One, who in Arda is called Iluvatar; and he made the first Ainur, The Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made.” – The Silmarillion.

Notice the word “made”, now does this offend you?  Or would you prefer manufacture?  Certainly we can’t have “The One”, or “The Unseen”, or “The Lord of Light and Life.”  And please remove “The Holy Ones” for our youth’s delicate sensibilities.

My point is simple and to the point, I inserted the creation story as context and support for all other stories that will follow, nineteen in all.

If anything regarding spirituality and spiritual beings offends you, then maybe a new breed of author should arrive and write that you are nothing more than a collection of dirty molecules that rode around the great galaxy on a cosmic snowball.  Then you crashed and a new world was made, sorry, manufactured, and your molecules shifted and changed until you became sludge, then a fish, then an ape, and then evolved in all knowing political animal.  Now for me that would be pretty boring and not challenging for the mind.

Oh and please never question the origin of good or evil in Star Wars, Harry Potter, or other books and movies, it just might lead you on a quest to the realm of independent thought and discussion of what we are.  But if you are ready for a story, forged more along the lines of Lord of The Rings, then satisfy your curiosity and then send me a message if you want to calmly discuss issues of the entire story, etc. And if the review of a 14 year old female assists, here is what she had to say:

“It took a while for me to truly get into the book, but after the first few chapters, I was hooked! I loved how detailed the first few chapters were. The author gave me a great view of the history of the wonderful universe. I’m a huge J.R.R. Tolkien fan, but I have to say that this was 100 times better than the Lord of the Rings, the Hobbit, and the Silmarillion combined! The races of Allivar’s living beings are much more creative than elves, men, dwarves, hobbits, etc. I think that even if you were a person who doesn’t really care for fiction/fantasy, you would still be hooked on this book and perhaps change your opinion on those types of genres.”

Have a great weekend.