Faith

Unseen

Since late 2011, I have been promoting my trilogy, The Chosen One of Allivar.  The story is a mythology which requires creation, life and end of times.  I’ve sold quite a few, but reviews and ratings have been very, very difficult to receive.  I’ve been told it is very good, but apparently posting a review is too difficult.  I have restrained myself from marketing it as a faith based story, because too many would never read it.  Chapter one in Rise of the Fallen starts out very similar to Genesis.  The tale of the fallen Charafuse (Angels) is very similar to that of the Satan story, and there are many inferences to stories in the Bible.  I did this for a marketing purpose, to bring familiarity to my story of the three Abrahamic religions of which there are more than a billion potential readers, nothing more.  What may appear as a religious story, is not. Here is a definition of religion:

Religion is an organized collection of beliefs, cultural systems, and world views that relate humanity to the supernatural, and to spirituality.

Since we live in a period of history where mythologies, even with the slightest hint of a creator, is deemed religious by the secular society, I will then market the trilogy and the upcoming 16 chronicles stories as a series of stories of faith, hope and spirituality.  In the end, the story is about mankind’s ability to be proper stewards and provides thought on immortal life.  It revolves around free will, family, spouse, children, races, and even the animals.

In the year 1999, I was challenged by a friend to write a story centered around a creator as the source of good, rather than the benign references in many stories.  Stars Wars has the “Force”, Lord of the Rings had the power of the elves given to them by Eru (The One), and Narnia has Aslan the Lion who is a representation of Jesus.  Robert Jordan, the author of The Wheel of Time has a creation story very similar to Christianity. George RR Martin refers to the old and new gods.  Gods lay down laws and the expectations of their creations.

In the end, the story is one about faith in something greater than ourselves and how one man is chosen to deliver the enslaved and a message to all of the living. The words Chosen One, do not refer to Christ.  Christ was God incarnate.  My hero is a mere mortal, asked to rise to the greatest challenge of all – to unite the seven divided races and stand against evil, before there is nothing left but death, darkness and eternal silence.

You will notice many inferences to other mythologies such as King Arthur and that created by Tolkien.  You will see the influence of Dante’s Inferno and Milton’s Paradise Lost.  In its simplest of form it is derived from this popular quote:

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

It is spiritual, highly emotional and so very human of a story.  It is allegorical, it has meaning and a moral behind it.  Will we the living finally become the stewards we were meant to be?  This is the question and should challenge all those who have faith and hope that there is greatness in and after life.

So now I submit to all those who love stories of faith, whether it be Life of Pi, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Wheel of Time, or another story I have not yet read – take a chance on a timeless story of good and evil and faith in things unseen. I am not asking you to convert to anything, follow me, or start a cult, but to enjoy a story – that’s all.  I promise you will be crying and cheering at the same time.

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The Significance of Seven

Seven

I am in the midst of writing a mythology that will consist of nineteen stories.  Nineteen has no significant meaning, but here is why there are nineteen:

  1. A trilogy (The Chosen One of Allivar) with the brief history of creation of ten heavenly worlds and through the first six ages of Allivar, prior to the introduction of the seventh age and my main character, Arimar. (3)
  2. A chronicles series of nine stories that explore the fall of nine of ten heavenly worlds. (9)
  3. A chronicles series of seven stories that represent all that took place in the six ages before the messenger and what was taking place that the messenger was unaware of as the seven races gathered and united to arrive on the final day of battle. (7)

And that is how I arrive at nineteen stories.  But let’s explore the number seven a little deeper.

Seven is a very unique number in mythology and religion.  Seven represents perfect completion as in the number of days of the creation of earth (whether you believe or not).  There are seven deadly vices and seven virtues.  If one masters the virtues, they are said to be perfect.   I have been fascinated with this concept in an Epic Fantasy setting.

Seven is a number found in many of our most popular stories, such as Harry Potter, The Lord of The Rings and the Songs of Fire and Ice. In The Silmarillion, there are seven Lords and Ladies of the Valar. Feanor has seven sons. In my trilogy, Arimar is the seventh son, of the seventh line of the prophets.  My mythical creator creates seven races as a test of racial harmony, and creates 686 total beings (7 races times 7 males and 7 females) = 343 times 2 = 686.  I did this so that each race had seven couples from which procreation could take place without any inference to incest.

Arimar befriends the seventh son of the seventh father of each race.  He has six captains that follow him they position themselves at seven points of the Wall of Masara, to combat Haggarfuse, the leader of the seven fallen Charafuse (angels).

In the final battle the Unseen, three of his loyal Charafuse and four Seramen come to battle (seven) and the armies of light, comprising the spirits of all the seven races who died not only on the nine fallen worlds, but in the seven ages of Allvar.

In the last chronicles series, you will be greeted by other references to seven, such as the seven swords, the seven underworlds, the seven hidden cities of gold, and the seven staffs of the prophets.  Who knows what I will add next, I’m only on book number five.  Come join me in this journey.  You will have a lot of fun along the way.

If you are intrigued by the number seven and how you can use it in a story of your own, here’s a wikipedia link

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